Go to intuniv.com for more information about INTUNIV (guanfacine).
ADHD today
JAN
27
2014

Tips to Help Your Child Get Organized

Children with ADHD may struggle with organizational skills. Below are some tips that may help you teach your child how to get organized, reduce clutter, and keep it up over time. Although it may be frustrating, remember to never give up! It takes time to change old ways and develop new habits.

Getting Organized at Home

Give them space
Provide enough storage space so that it's quick and easy to put things away. At a minimum, make sure your child has a hamper, garbage can, and some shelving in his or her room.

Label bins
Place large bins or baskets in your child's room, and label each one for laundry, shoes, toys, and more. This will help keep your child's room clear of clutter.

Organize clothing
Give your child two laundry baskets: one for dirty clothes and another for clothes that can be worn again. That way, your child won't throw clothes on the floor or wash clothes unnecessarily.

Limit possessions
If your child has too many clothes, toys, or other possessions, it may get overwhelming to manage it all. Simplify the cleaning process by having fewer things.

Create to-do lists
To-do lists may be a powerful organization tool for families affected by ADHD. Instead of expecting your child to remember everything he or she has to do, write it down.

Color coordinate activities
While jotting down new items on your family calendar, try color-coding them! Make sports, homework, and doctor's appointments different colors.

Motivate your child
Can't get your child to clean out his or her closets? Motivate your child to do a bedroom cleaning by having a garage sale and letting him or her keep the proceeds.

Getting Organized at School

Clean up the locker
To help your child organize his or her locker, encourage your child to get rid of anything that doesn't belong (such as garbage), assign specific areas to specific belongings, and add extra shelves if necessary.

Simplify papers
Give your child folders for each type of school paper: one for new homework, one for completed homework, and another for permission slips.

Encourage organization
Buy your child school gear that promotes organization, such as a backpack with several labeled compartments for different school supplies.

Plan ahead
Help your child pack his or her backpack each night before going to bed. On the weekends, help your child go through his or her backpack to remove old work and replenish supplies as necessary.

What is INTUNIV?

INTUNIV is a prescription medicine used to treat Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients ages 6 to 17. INTUNIV may be used alone or added to an ADHD stimulant medicine. INTUNIV was shown to work in clinical studies lasting up to 8 weeks.

Important Safety Information About INTUNIV (guanfacine)

Patients should not take INTUNIV if they are allergic to guanfacine or other ingredients in INTUNIV, or other medicines containing guanfacine. Tell the doctor about all medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements your child is taking.

INTUNIV may cause serious side effects including low blood pressure, low heart rate, fainting, and sleepiness.

Before starting INTUNIV, tell the doctor if your child has low blood pressure, low heart rate, heart problems, has fainted, has liver or kidney problems, or has any other medical condition. You should also tell the doctor if your child is pregnant, breast-feeding, or plans to become pregnant or breast-feed.

Patients should drink plenty of water and not get overheated while taking INTUNIV.

Patients should not drive or use machinery like lawn mowers or power tools until they know how INTUNIV affects them. INTUNIV can slow thinking and motor skills. While taking INTUNIV, patients should not drink alcohol or take other medicines that can cause sleepiness or dizziness because these symptoms may get worse.

The most common side effects of INTUNIV include sleepiness, tiredness, trouble sleeping, low blood pressure, nausea, stomach pain, and dizziness.

INTUNIV should be swallowed whole without crushing, chewing, or breaking the tablet. INTUNIV should not be taken with a high-fat meal. Do not change the dose or stop INTUNIV without talking with the doctor. The doctor will regularly check your child's blood pressure and heart rate.

Please see Full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

INTUNIV (guanfacine) is a prescription medicine used to treat ADHD in kids ages 6-17. INTUNIV was shown to work in clinical studies lasting up to 8 weeks.
Important Safety Information
Patients should not take INTUNIV if they are allergic to guanfacine or other ingredients in INTUNIV, or other medicinces containing guanfacine. INTUNIV may cause serious side effects including low blood pressure, low heart rate, fainting, and sleepiness.
Important Safety Information and
Full Prescribing Information (PDF)

Go to intuniv.com for more information about INTUNIV (guanfacine).
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